SOUTH ASIANS AND MENTAL HEALTH

 

One of the major points that MannMukti would like to convey to the general public is that a relative lack of data and information on South Asian mental health does not necessarily mean that the problem is non-existent. In fact, the data is often there, but it is sometimes swept up in a larger sea of relevant findings. In other words, there has been a limited push to identify and isolate South Asians in particular when researching psychological illnesses.

The research compiled here seeks to remedy that problem by providing a few examples of where the distinction has been made. Additionally, it provides insight on the consequences of certain traditions on the South Asian psyche including personal accounts from people around the world.
 

The source: 
The Huffington Post

 

Summary:

Therapists are changing their tactics when it comes to tackling mental health in Asian communities, in ways such as involving the families of patients in the treatment process and speaking to patients in their native language. Community outreach is becoming more commonplace as people reject the stigma associated with seeking mental health care.
 

The details:
Read more here.

The source: 

FirstPost

Summary:

India has a high suicide rate, especially among younger people around the ages of 15-19. Factors contributing to this statistic include a lack of access to mental health care, lack of adult supervision, and access to clean water. A comprehensive national plan could help reduce the number of suicides as well as the amount of people suffering from mental illness.

The details:
Read more here.

The source: 

Institute of Alcohol Studies

Summary:

Alcoholism is a very dangerous issue that can affect anyone regardless of ethnicity; however, many South Asians cannot disclose their condition to their family or receive the help that they need due to the shame it could bring upon their families. Alcoholism itself brings about feelings of loneliness and isolation and the stigma surrounding mental health, especially in South Asian communities, magnifies those feelings.
 

The details:
Read more here.

The source: 

Social Science and Medicine

Summary:

Researchers explored how far mental health care professionals’ perceptions and understandings about South Asian women are derived from cultural stereotypes. The findings in this study suggest that women from South Asian communities are likely to be viewed as suffering from depression by mental health care professionals whose preconceptions are rooted in stereotypical assumptions about repressive Asian cultures.

The details:
Read more here.

© 2019 by MannMukti